Our network

Health

Eye care experts urge parents to leave fireworks to pros

Eye care experts urge parents to leave fireworks to pros

ATLANTA -- Thousands of Georgia parents are buying sparklers for their children this Fourth of July, thinking they are a safe way to celebrate. But, as a Georgia eye expert warns, sparklers heat up to 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit -- hot enough to melt some metals -- and are the number one cause of fireworks injuries requiring trips to the emergency room.

Members of the Georgia Optometric Association are urging parents to leave all the fireworks to the professionals and avoid fireworks that may cause serious eye injuries when used inappropriately. Some of the most common fireworks injuries are eye abrasions, lacerations, contusions and foreign matter in the eye. The majority of these cases are related to the use of sparklers.

Kroger raises $232K for Children's Miracle Network

Kroger raises $232K for Children's Miracle Network

(WXIA) -- Kroger customers in metro Atlanta recently showed that they are a charitable bunch.

During the final two weeks in May, shoppers raised $232,000 for the Children's Miracle Network through the Miracle Balloons promotion.

For only $1, a customer could purchase a paper balloon to hang in a local Kroger. All proceeds from the fundraiser went directly to Children's Miracle Network hospitals and health networks, such as Children's Hospital of Georgia in Augusta and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

"Kroger customers consistently show their care for our communities by constantly going above and beyond with their charitable donations," Glynn Jenkins, spokesperson for Kroger's Atlanta division, said in a release. "Through their support of the Miracle Balloons program, we can continue to make a difference in the lives of children."

Stress control, mental health discussions planned for senior facilities

Stress control, mental health discussions planned for senior facilities

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. -- Stress management and mental health discussions are planned during the first week in June at two Fulton County senior multipurpose facilities.

The Dorothy C. Benson Senior Multipurpose Complex will host a mental health workshop sponsored by the Renaissance on Peachtree on Thursday, June 5. The discussion will be facilitated by Leslie Sessley, a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) with the Link Counseling Center. The two-hour presentation begins at 10 a.m.  The Benson Multipurpose Complex is located at 6500 Vernon Woods Drive in Sandy Springs.  For more information about this event, citizens should contact Lila Womack, Life Enrichment Coordinator at 404-613-4900.

Panera swears off artificial ingredients

Panera swears off artificial ingredients

NEW YORK -- Panera says it will remove artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and preservatives from its food by 2016, a reflection of the growing distaste people are showing for such ingredients.

The chain of bakery cafes, which has about 1,800 U.S. locations, is making the pledge as part of a "Food Policy" it is unveiling Tuesday that outlines its commitment to "clean" and "simple" ingredients.

The announcement comes at a time when Panera Bread Co. is facing slowing sales growth and working to jumpstart its business.

It also underscores how positioning foods as natural has become a marketing advantage, regardless of whether it brings any nutritional benefits.

Don’t let pool chemicals ruin summer swims

Don’t let pool chemicals ruin summer swims

ATLANTA -- School is out and neighborhoods all across Georgia are opening their swimming pools for the season. To protect consumers, eye care experts are asking swimmers to be aware that an imbalance of chemicals in the water may put their vision and eye health at risk.

The Georgia Optometric Association is urging people to take simple steps that will protect the health of their eyes and help them avoid problems such as chemical conjunctivitis and chemical keratitis.

Fulton County Cooperative Extension offers food safety tips for power outages

Fulton County Cooperative Extension offers food safety tips for power outages

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. -- In the event that power goes out for an extended period of time in your neighborhood, Fulton County Cooperative Extension and the food preservation specialists and food safety specialists at the University of Georgia want you to know that the food in your refrigerator and freezer may be saved if you take special care during the outage.

“There are several steps a family can take to protect the food they have stored in their freezer,” states Menia Chester, Director of Fulton County Cooperative Extension. “Being careful to follow the recommendations from UGA should help in keeping your family safe.”

First, unplug the freezer and refrigerator, as well as other appliances, to protect them from electricity surges when power returns. Also make sure everyone in your household knows not to open the refrigerator or freezer doors; keeping the doors closed will keep the food cold for a longer period of time.

Cooperative extension available to help navigate health insurance marketplace

Cooperative extension available to help navigate health insurance marketplace

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. -- Fulton County Cooperative Extension welcomes the UGA Cooperative Extension Health Navigator to provide one-on-one sessions for individuals and families who need assistance enrolling in a health insurance plan through the national Health Insurance Marketplace.

Interested persons should allot one hour for an appointment session. Call 404-613-7670 to schedule an appointment.

The Health Navigator, housed under UGA Cooperative Extension, is able to help residents decide on the best health insurance to meet their needs. The Navigator will also help them apply, either electronically or by paper; establish eligibility; enroll in coverage and to potentially qualify for an insurance affordability program.

One-on-one sessions are by appointment only and will be held as follows: